Skip navigation
College Quarterly
Winter 2015 - Volume 18 Number 1
Student Affairs and Services Stream: College Quarterly
By Neil Buddel

I remember attending the Canadian Institute of Student Affairs and Services (CISAS) in Victoria, BC early in my career as I was drawn to learning about the area from veterans in the area: one of whom was Dr. Peggy Patterson. As part of the introduction Peggy explicated that student affairs practitioners are professionals within a profession because a body of scholarship exists to inform our educational practice.

I internalized this introduction to the field, extending Dr. Patterson’s comment to mean that, to be a profession, the scholarship must be robust and continually growing. Further, to be considered a professional, student affairs practitioners must consult the student success scholarship to inform practice and engage in dialogue concerning intersections between academic scholarship and practice.

While agreement does not exist on the terms profession and professional (indeed, some would argue that student affairs is not a profession and we are not professionals), the key point is that, as educators within an educational field, scholarship and meaningful dialogue must flourish to continually shape and enhance students’ personal, social, and academic development as they transition in, through, and beyond our postsecondary institutions. And the scope is broad.

It’s long been established by notable scholars (see Pascarella and Terenzini) that psychosocial and cognitive development occur both inside and outside the classroom; learning is not, and cannot be, restricted based on operational divides between student and academic affairs. The entire campus is a learning environment.

College Quarterly is pleased to introduce a stream for academic and scholar-practitioner dialogue concerning student affairs and services – an important stream during an exciting time in the field.

To contribute to the growth and enhancement of the field, scholars and scholar-practitioners are invited to contribute original pieces that advance scholarship and/or practice around facilitating students’ academic, personal, and social development as they transition into, through, and beyond our campuses.

I’ve included a list of references that I’ve found beneficial in my doctoral work and in the OISE M.Ed. class I facilitated on student development and services. While some resources are predictable (e.g., those related to general student success or specific populations like first-generation students), others (such as those related to social class, narrative, and learning organizations) have important intersections with student affairs and services scholarship and practice.

It’s not intended to be an exhaustive list, but a starting point for this stream and your future contributions.

Commuter Students

Chickering, A.W. (1974). Commuting Versus Resident Students: Overcoming the Educational Inequities of Living Off Campus. San Francisco, Jossey-Bass Inc.

Gianoutsos, D., & Rosser, V. (2014). Is there still a considerable difference? Comparing residential and commuter student profile characteristics at a public, research, commuter college. College Student Journal, 48(4), 613-628.

Jacoby, B. & Garland, J. (2005). Strategies for enhancing commuter student success. Journal of College Student Retention, 6(1), 61-79.

Kuh, G, Gonyea, R.M., & Palmer, M. (2005). The disengaged commuter student: Fact or fiction? Available at http://nsse.iub.edu
/pdf/commuter.pdf

Liu, R., & Jung, L. (1980). The commuter student and student satisfaction. Research in Higher Education, 12(3), 215-226.

Lizzio, A. (2006). Designing an orientation and transition strategy for commencing students. Retrieved from http://www.griffith.edu.au
/__data/assets/pdf_file/0008/51875/Alfs-5-Senors-Paper-FYE-Project,-2006.pdf

Mattanah, J.F., Ayers, J.F., Brand, B.L., Brooks, L.J., Quimby, J.L., McNary, S.W. (2010). A social Support Intervention to Ease the College Transition: Exploring Main Effects and Moderators. Journal of College Student Development 51 (1),93-108.

Nelson, K.J., Quinn, C., Marrington, A., Clark, J.A. (2012). Good Practice for Enhancing the Engagement and Success of Commencing Students. Journal of Higher Education 63, 83-96.

Newbold, J.J., Mahta, S.S., Forbus, P. (2011). Commuter Students: Involvement and Identification with an Institution of Higher Education. Academic of Educational Leadership Journal 15 (2), 141-153.

Noble, K., Flynn, N.T., Lee, J.D., Hilton, D. (2007). Predicting Successful College Experiences: Evidence From a First Year Retention Program. Journal of College Student Retention. 9 (1), 36-60.

The Field of Postsecondary

Angus, I. (2009). Love the questions: University education and enlightenment. Winnipeg, MB:
Arbeiter Ring Publishing.

Barnett, R. (1988). Does higher education have aims? Journal of Philosophy of Education (22),
2, 239-250.

Oakeshott, M. (1996). The needs of students and the scholarly culture. In P.C. Emberley (Ed.), Zero tolerance – Hot button politics in Canada’s universities (pp. 21-58). Penguin Books.

Underrepresented Students and Social Class

Abes, E.S. (2009). Theoretical borderlands: Using multiple theoretical perspectives to challenge inequitable power structures in student development theory. Journal of College Student Development, 50(2), pp. 141-156.

Allen, K. A. (2003). University access and educational opportunity: A Canadian perspective. In K. S. Brathwaite (Ed.), Access and equity in the university (pp. 79-91). Toronto, ON: Canadian Scholars’ Press.

Andres, L., Adamuti-Trache, M., Yoon, E., Pidgeon, M., & Thomsen, J.P. (2007). Educational expectations, parental social class, gender, and postsecondary attainment: A 10-year perspective. Youth and Society, 39(2), 135-163.

Andres, L. & Krahn, H. (1999). Youth pathways in articulated post-secondary systems: Enrolment and completion patterns of urban young women and men. Canadian Journal of Higher Education, 19(1), 47-82.

Aries, E. & Seider, M. (2005). The interactive relationship between class identity and the college experience: The case of lower income students. Qualitative Sociology, 28(4), 419-443.

Barr-Telford, L., Cartwright, F., Prasil, S., & Shimmons, K. (2003). Access, persistence and financing: First results from the postsecondary education participation survey (PEPS) (Statistics Canada Catalogue No. 81-595-MIE2003007). Ottawa: Minister of Industry Canada.

Berger, J.B. (2000). Optimizing capital, social reproduction, and undergraduate persistence: A sociological perspective. In J.M. Braxton (Ed.), Reworking the student departure puzzle (pp. 95-124). Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University Press.

Bourdieu, P. (1971). Systems of education and systems of thought. In M.K.D. Young (Ed.),  Knowledge, education and cultural change (pp. 487-510). London, UK: Tavistock.

Bourdieu, P. (1977). Outline of a theory of practice. Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.

Bourdieu, P. (1984). Distinction: A social critique of the judgement of taste. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Bourdieu, P. (1991). Language and symbolic power. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Bourdieu, P. (1990). The logic of practice. Oxford, Cambridge: Blackwell Publishers.

Bourdieu, P. (1993). The field of cultural production. New York, NY: Columbia University Press.

Brennan, J., & Naidoo, R. (2008). Higher education and the achievement (and/or prevention) of equity and social justice. Higher Education, 56, 287-302.

Bugyi, P. (2008). Cultural capital and educational attainment: A critique of the research. Paper presented at the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Boston, MA.

Childs, S., Finnie, R., & Mueller, R.E. (2010). Family environment, family habits, and children’s cultural experiences: Is there a link to participation in post-secondary education? In R. Finnie, M. Frenette, R.E. Mueller, & A. Sweetman (Eds.), Pursuing higher education in Canada: Economic, social, and policy dimensions (pp. 243-265). Montreal and Kingston, ON: Queen’s Policy Studies Series, McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Colombo, E., & Rebughini, P. (2012). Children of immigrants in a globalized world: A generational experience. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Corak, M. (2004). Generational income mobility in North America and Europe: An introduction. In M. Corak (Ed.), Generational income mobility in North America and Europe (pp. 1-37). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Corak, M., Lipps, G., & Zhao, J. (2003). Family income and participation in post-secondary education (Statistics Canada Catalogue No. 11F0019MIE No. 210). Ottawa: Minister of Industry Canada.

Duquette, C. (2000). Experiences at university: Perceptions of students with disabilities. The Canadian Journal of Higher Education, 30(2), pp. 123-142.

Esping-Andersen, G. (2004). Unequal opportunities and the mechanisms of social inheritance. In M. Corak (Ed.), Generational income mobility in North America and Europe (pp. 289-314). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Finnie, R. (2005). Access to post-secondary education: An analytical framework and new evidence on background effects. In R. Sweet & P. Anisef (Eds.), Preparing for post-secondary education: New roles for governments and families. Montreal, QC: McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Finnie, R., Lascelles, E., & Sweetman, A. (2005). Who goes? The direct and indirect effects of family background on access to post-secondary education (Statistics Canada Catalogue No. 11F0019MIE – No. 237). Ottawa: Minister of Industry Canada.

Finnie, R., & Mueller, R.E. (2010). They came, they saw, they enrolled: Access to post- secondary education by the children of Canadian immigrants. In R. Finnie, M. Frenette, R.E. Mueller, & A. Sweetman (Eds.), Pursuing higher education in Canada: Economic, social, and policy dimensions (pp. 191-216). Montreal and Kingston, ON: Queen’s Policy Studies Series, McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Finnie, R., Sweetman, A., & Usher, A. (2008). Introduction: A framework for thinking about participation in post-secondary education. In R. Finnie, R.E. Mueller, A. Sweetman, & A. Usher (Eds.), Who goes? Who stays? What matters? Accessing and persisting in post-secondary education in Canada (pp. 3-32). Montreal, QC: McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Fleras, A. (2005). Social problems in Canada: Conditions, constructions, and challenges. Toronto, ON: Prentice Hall.

Fried, J. (1997). Changing ethical frameworks for a multicultural world. New Directions for Student Services, 77, pp. 5-22.

Grayson, J.P. (1995). Does race matter? Outcomes of the first year experience in a Canadian university. The Canadian Journal of Higher Education, 25(2), pp. 79-109.

Grabb, E. (2009). General introduction. In E. Grabb & N. Gyppy (Eds.), Social inequality in Canada: Patterns, problems, and policies (pp. 1-16). Toronto, ON: Pearson Prentice Hall.

Grenfell, M. (2012). Pierre Bourdieu key concepts. Bristol, CT: Acumen Publishing.

Grenfell, M., & James, D. (1998). Bourdieu and education: Acts of practical theory. London:
Falmer Press.

Horvat, E.M. (2001). Understanding equity and access in higher education: The potential contribution of Pierre Bourdieu. In. J.C. Smart (Ed.), Higher education: Handbook of theory and research volume XVI (pp. 195-238). New York, NY: Agathon Press.

Krahn, H. (2009). Choose your parents carefully: Social class, post-secondary education, and occupational outcomes. In E. Grabb & N. Gyppy (Eds.), Social inequality in Canada: Patterns, problems, and policies (pp. 1-16). Toronto, ON: Pearson Prentice Hall.

Lambert, M., Zeman, K., Allen, M., & Bussiere, P. (2004). Who pursues postsecondary education, who leaves and why: Results from the youth in transition survey (Statistics Canada Catalogue No. 81-595-MIE2004026). Ottawa: Minister of Industry Canada.

Lefebvre, P., & Merrigan, P. (2010). The impact of family background and cognitive and non- cognitive ability in childhood on post-secondary education. In R. Finnie, M. Frenette, R.E. Mueller, & A. Sweetman (Eds.), Pursuing higher education in Canada: Economic, social, and policy dimensions (pp. 219-242). Montreal and Kingston, ON: Queen’s Policy Studies Series, McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Longden, B. (2004). Interpreting student early departure from higher education through the lens of cultural capital. Tertiary Education and Management, 10, 121-138.

Marker, M. (2004). The four Rs revisited: Some reflections on First Nations and higher Education. In L. Andres and F. Finlay (Eds.), Student affairs: Experiencing higher education (pp. 171-188). Vancouver, BC: UBC Press.

Mueller, R.E. (2008). Access and persistence of students in Canadian post-secondary education: What we know, what we don’t know, and why it matters. In R. Finnie, R.E. Mueller, A. Sweetman, & A. Usher (Eds.), Who goes? Who stays? What matters? Accessing and persisting in post-secondary education in Canada (pp. 33-61). Montreal and Kingston, ON: Queen’s Policy Studies Series, McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Parkin, A., & Baldwin, N. (2009). Persistence in post-secondary education. In J. Berger, A. Motte, & A. Parkin (Eds.), The Price of knowledge: Access and student finances (pp. 64-84). Montreal, QC: The Canada Millennium Scholarship Foundation.

Pidgeon, M., Archibald, J. & Hawkey, C. (2014). Relationships matter: Supporting Aboriginal graduate students in British Columbia, Canada. Canadian Journal of Higher Education, 44(1), pp. 1-21.

Pizzolato, J.E. (2003). Developing self-authorship: Exploring the experiences of high-risk college students. Journal of College Student Development, 44(6), pp. 797-812.

Reay, D. (2004). ‘It’s all becoming a habitus’: Beyond the habitual use of habitus in educational research. British Journal of Sociology of Education, 24(4), 431-444.

Reay, D., Crozier, G., & Clayton, J. (2009). ‘Strangers in paradise’? Working-class students in elite universities. Sociology, 43(6), 1103-1121.

Reay, D., Davies, J., David, M., & Ball, S.J. (2001). Choices of degree or degrees of choice? Class, ‘race’ and the higher education choice process. Sociology, 35(4), 855-874.

Rendon, L.I., Jalomo, R.E., & Nora, A. (2000). Theoretical considerations in the study of minority student retention in higher education. In J. M. Braxton (Ed.), Reworking the student departure puzzle (pp. 127-156). Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University Press.

Reybold, L.E., Halx, Mark D. & Jimenez, A.L. (2008). Professional integrity in higher education: A study of administrative staff ethics in student affairs. Journal of College Student Development, 49(2), pp. 110-124.

Roemer, J. E., (2004). Equal opportunity and intergenerational mobility: Going beyond intergenerational income transition matrices. In M. Corak (Ed.), Generational income mobility in North America and Europe (pp. 48-57). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. 

Schmaus, D., & Wimmer, R (2013). Government policy and postsecondary education in Alberta: A ‘field theory’ analysis. Alberta Journal of Educational Research, 59(1), 92.107.

Tanaka, G.K. (2002). Higher education’s self-reflexive turn: Toward an intercultural theory of student development. The Journal of Higher Education, 73(2), pp. 263-296.

Taylor, G. D. (1994). Sociological interpretations of schooling: The functional perspective. In L. Erwin & D. MacLennan (Eds.), Sociology of education in Canada: Critical perspectives of theory, research & practice (pp. 32-54). Toronto, ON: Copp Clark Longman Ltd.

Torres, V., Jones, S.R. & Renn, K.A. (2009). Identity development theories in student affairs: Origins, current status, and new approaches. Journal of College Student Development, 50(6), pp. 577-596.

Tremblay, P.F., Harries, R., Berman, H., MacQuarrie, B., Hutchinson, G.E., Smith, M.A., Braley, S., Jelley, J. & Dearlove, K. (2008). Negative social experiences of university and college students. Canadian Journal of Higher Education, 38(3), pp. 57-75.

Vryonides, M. (2007). Social and cultural capital in educational research: Issues of operationalisation and measurement. British Educational Research Journal, 33(6), 867-885.

Walpole, M. (2003). Socioeconomic status and college: How SES affects college experiences and outcomes. The Review of Higher Education, 27(1), 45-73.

Webb, J., Schirato, T., & Danaher, G. (2014). Understanding Bourdieu. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

First-Generation Students

Bryan, E. & Simmons, L.A. (2009). Family involvement: Impacts on post-secondary educational success for first-generation Appalachian college students. Journal of College Student Development, 50(4), 391-406.

Collier, P.J. & Morgan, D.L. (2008). “Is that paper really due today?”: Differences in first- generation and traditional college students’ understandings of faculty expectations. Higher Education, 55, 425-446.

Gibbons, M.M., & Borders, L.D. (2010). Prospective first-generation college students: A social- cognitive perspective. The Career Development Quarterly, 58, 194-208.

Granfield, R. (1991). Making it by faking it: Working-class students in an elite academic environment. Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, 20(3), 331-351.

Kaufman, P. (2003). Learning to not labor: How working-class individuals construct middle- class identities. The Sociological Quarterly, 44(3), 481-504.

Knighton, T. (2002). Postsecondary participation: The effect of parents’ education and household income. Education Quarterly Review, 8(3), 25-36.

Knighton, T., & Mirza, S. (2002). Postsecondary participation: The effects of parents’ education and household income. Education Quarterly Review, 8(3), 25-32.

Lehmann, W. (2004). ‘For some reason, I get a little scared’: Structure, agency, and risk in school-work transitions. Journal of Youth Studies, 7(4), 379-396.

Lehmann, W. (2007). “I just didn’t feel like I fit in”: The role of habitus in university dropout decisions. Canadian Journal of Higher Education, 37(2), 89-110.

Lehmann, W. (2009). Becoming middle class: How working-class university students draw and transgress moral class boundaries. Sociology, 43, 631-647.

Longwell-Grice, R., & Longwell-Grice, H. (2008). Testing Tinto: How do retention theories work for first-generation, working-class students? Journal of College Student Retention, 9(4), 407-420.

Pike, G.R., & Kuh, G.D. (2005). First- and second-generation college students: A comparison of their engagement and intellectual development. The Journal of Higher Education, 76(3), 276-300.

Ward, L., Siegel, M.J., & Davenport, Z. (2012). First generation college students: Understanding and improving the experience from recruitment to commencement. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Ziemniak, A. (2010, January 1). The contribution of family members to first-generation college student success: A narrative approach. ProQuest LLC, Retrieved from EBSCOhost.

Narrative Compositions of Experience

Adichie, C. N. (2009). The danger of a single story (TEDGlobal, filmed July 2009). Retrieved from http://www.ted.com/talks
/chimamanda_adichie_the_danger_of_a_single_story

Bateson, M. C. (1994). Peripheral visions: Along the way. New York: NY: Harper Collins Publishers.

Bateson, M.C. (2000). Full circles, overlapping lives: Culture and generation in transition. New
York, NY: Random House.

Caine, V., Estefan, A., & Clandinin, D.J. (2013). A return to methodological commitment: Refleflections on narrative inquiry. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, 57(6), 574-586.

Carr, D. (1986). The self and the coherence of life. Time, narrative and history. Bloomington, IN : Indiana University Press.

Clandinin, D.J. (2006). Narrative inquiry : A methodology for studying lived experience. Research Studies in Music Education, 27, 44-54.

Clandinin, D.J. (2013). Engaging in narrative inquiry. Walnut Creek, CA : Left Coast Press.

Clandinin, D.J., & Connelly, F.M. (2000). Narrative inquiry: Experience and story in qualitative research. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Georgakopoulou, A. (2006). Thinking big with small stories in narrative and identity analysis. Narrative Inquiry, 16(1), 122-130.

Georgakopoulou, A. (2007). Small stories, interaction and identities. Amsterdam, NLD: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

Greene, M. (1995). Releasing the imagination: Essays on education, the arts, and social change. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

Heilbrun, C. G. (1999). The rewards of liminality. In C. G. Heilbrun (Ed.), Women’s lives: The view from the threshold (pp. 83-103). Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press.

Kerby, A. P. (1991). Time and memory. In J. Salis (Ed.), Narrative and the self: Studies in continental thought (pp. 15-31). Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.

Okri, B. (2011). A time for new dreams. London, UK: Rider Publishing.

Riessman, C.K. (2008). Narrative methods for the human sciences. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Sarbin, T.R. (2004). The role of imagination in narrative construction. In C. Daiute and C. Lightfoot (Eds.), Narrative analysis: Studying the development of individuals in society (pp. 5-20). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Mental Health and Resilience

Borrero, N., Lee, D.S., & Padilla, A.M. (2013). Developing a culture of resilience for low- income immigrant youth. Urban Review, 45, 99-116.

Hausmann, L.R.M., Schofield, J.W., & Woods, R.L. (2007). Sense of belonging as a predictor of intentions to persist among African American and white first-year college students. Research in Higher Education, 48(7), 803-839.

Hirschi (2012): British Journal of Guidance and Counselling and titled, The Career Resources Model: An Integrative Framework for Career Counsellors.

Masten, A.S., & Obradovic, J. (2006). Competence and resilience in development. Annals New York Academy of Sciences, 1094, 13-27.

Miller, A.S. (2007). Students that persist: caring relationships that make a big difference in higher education. Retrieved September 24, 2008 from OvidSP.

Yeager, D.S., & Dweck, C.S. (2012). Mindsets that promote resilience: When students believe that personal characteristics can be developed. Educational Psychologist, 47(4), 302-314.

http://www.cacuss.ca/current_projects_mental_health_report.htcm  

http://blogs.hbr.org/2013/07/surprises-are-the-new-normal-r/

http://www.cmha.ca/mental-health/your-mental-health/resilience/

http://www.camhx.ca/Publications/Resources_for_Professionals
/Growing_Resilient/undertstanding_resilience.html

http://www.selfinjury.bctr.cornell.edu/perch/resources/connectedness-suicide-prevent.pdf

Organizational Behaviour and Policy Analysis

Buddel, N. (2011). Queering the workplace. Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services, 23(1), 131-146.

Crossan, M., Lane, H. W., & White, R. E. (1999). An organizational learning framework: from intuition to institution. Academy of Management Review. Downloaded June 14, 2002 from http://proquest.umi.com.

Engestrom, Y. (2001). Expansive learning at work: Toward an activity theoretical reconceptualization. Journal of Education and Work, 14(1), 133-156.

Fenwick, T. (2004). Toward a critical HRD in theory and practice. Adult Education Quarterly, 54(3), 193-209.

Fenwick, T. (2006). Toward enriched conceptions of work learning: Participation, expansion, and translation among individuals within activity. Human Resource Development Review, 5(3), 285-302.

Fuller, A., & Unwin, L. (2006). Expansive and restrictive environments. In K. Evans, P.

Hodkinson, H. Rainbird, and L. Unwin. Improving Workplace Learning (pp. 27-48). London: Routledge.

Interactive Associates. (2007). Facilitative leadership: Tapping the power of participation (See www.interactionassociates.com and http://www.interactionassociates.com/results-process-relationship for more information). San Fransciso: CA.

Lencioni, P. 2002. The five dysfunctions of a team: A leadership fable. Jossey-Bass: SanFrancisco.

Mitchell, C. & Sackney, L. (2001). Building capacity of a learning community. CJEAP (Canadian Journal of Educational Administration and Policy), 19. Downloaded February 24, 2001 from: http://www.umanitoba.ca
/publications/cjeap/Mitchell%20and%20Sackney.

Owens, R. G. 2001. Organizational behaviour in education: Instructional leadership and school reform (7th Ed.). Allyn and Bacon: MA.

Pal, L.A. (2010). Beyond policy analysis: Public issue management in turbulent times. Toronto, ON: Thompson/Nelson.

Senge, P. M. 1990. The fifth discipline: The art and practice of the learning organization. Doubleday: New York.

Yanow, D. (2000). Conducting interpretive policy analysis: Qualitative research methods (series 46). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.

Student Success

Astin, A. W. (1999). Student involvement: A developmental theory for higher education. Journal of College Student Development, 40(5), 518-529.

Baxter Magolda, M.B. (2003). Identity and learning: Student affairs’ role in transforming higher education. Journal of College Student Development, 44(2), pp. 231-247.

Belenky, M. F., Clinchy, B. M., Goldberger, N. R., & Tarule, J. M. (1986). Women’s ways of knowing: The development of self, voice, and mind. New York: Basic Books.

Bloland, P. A. (1991). An appraisal of student development research. [College students]. National convention of the american college personnel association, Atlanta, Georgia, 1. Retrieved May 30, 2005, from the EDRS database.

Braxton, J.M., Sullivan, A.V.S., & Johnson, R.M. (1997). Appraising Tinto’s theory of college student departure. In. J.C. Smart (Ed.), Higher education: Handbook of theory and research volume XII (pp. 107-164). New York, NY: Agathon Press.

Braxton, J.M., Milem, J.F., & Sullivan, A.S. (2000). The influence of active learning on the college student departure process. The Journal of Higher Education, 71(5), 569-590.

Bresciani, M.J., Moore Gardner, M., & Hickmott, J. (2010). Demonstrating student success: A practical guide to outcomes-based assessment of learning and development in student affairs. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. 

Brookfield, S. D. (2005). The power of critical theory: Liberating adult learning and teaching. SanFrancisco: Jossey-Bass.

Chickering, A. W., & Reisser, L. (1993). Education and identity: Second edition. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc.

Cox, D.H., & Strange, C.C. (2010). Achieving student success: Effective student services in Canadian higher education. Montreal, QC: McGill-Queen’s University Press. 

Cross, P. (1998). Why learning communities? Why now? About Campus, 4-11.

DeBard, R. (2004). Millennials coming to college. New Directions for Student Services, (106), 33-45.

Dunn, M. S., & Forney, D. S. (2004). Using entertainment media to inform student affairs teaching and practice related to student development theory. New Directions for Student Services, (108), 13-23.

Evans, N.J., Forney, D.S., Guido, F.M., & Patton, L.D. (2010). Student development in college: Theory, research, and practice (second edition). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. 

Foley, G. (1999). Learning in social action: A contribution to understanding informal
education. London: Zed Books.

Grace, A. P. (2001). Using queer cultural studies to transgress adult educational space. In V. Sheared, & P. A. Sissel (Eds.), Making space: Merging theory and practice in adult education. U.S.; Connecticut: Greenwood Publishing Group, Inc. Retrieved May 28, 2005, from http://search.epnet.com.login.ezproxy.library.ualberta.ca/login.aspx
?direct=true&db=eric&an=ED456250

Grace, A. P., & Hill, R. J. (2001). Using queer knowledges to build inclusionary pedagogy in adult education. 42nd annual meeting of the adult education research conference, Lansing, MI, Retrieved May 20, 2005, from the EBSCOhost database.

Howard-Hamilton, M. F. (2003). Theoretical frameworks for African American women. New Directions for Student Services, 104, 19-27.

Howe, H., & Strauss, W. (2000). Millennials rising: The next generation. United States: Vintage Books.

Javinar, J. M. (2000). Student life and development. New Directions for Higher Education, 111, 85-93.

King, P. M., & Howard-Hamilton, M. F. (2000). Using student development theory to inform institutional research. New Directions for Institutional Research, (108), 19.

King, P.M. (2009). Principles of development and developmental change underlying theories of cognitive and moral development. Journal of College Student Development 50(6), pp. 597-620.

Kuh, G.D. (2009). What student affairs professionals need to know about student engagement. Journal of College Student Development, 50(6), pp. 683-706.

Kodama, C. M., McEwen, M. K., Liang, C. T. H., & Lee, S. (2002). An asian american perspective on psychosocial student development theory. New Directions for Student Services, (97), 45.

Kuh, G. D., Douglas, K. B., Lund, J. P., & Ramin-Gyurnek, J. (1994). Student learning outside the classroom: Transcending artificial boundaries. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report No. 8. Washington, D.C.: The George Washington University, School of Education and Human Development.

Littleton, R. Jr. (2002). Afrocentricity: The missing task in black adult development?

Little Rock, AR: Philander Smith College. Retrieved May 30, 2005 from the EDRS database.

Love, P. (2012). Informal theory: The ignored link in theory-to-practice. Journal of College Student Development, 53(2), pp. 177-191.

MacKeracher, D. (2004). Making sense of adult learning (2nd ed.). Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Magolda, M. B. B. (1987). Experiential learning and student development theory as guides to developing instructional approaches. International Journal of Social Education, 1(3), 28-40.

Noble, K., Flynn, N. T., Lee, J. D., & Hilton, D. (2007). Predicting successful college experiences: evidence from a first year retention program. Journal of College Student Retention, 9(1), 39-60.

Pascarella, E., & Terenzini, P. (2005). How college affects students: A third decade of research (second edition). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. 

Pope, R. L. (1998). The relationship between psychosocial development and racial identity of black college students. Journal of College Student Development, 39(3), 273-282.

Porter, S.R. (2003). Understanding retention outcomes: Using multiple data sources to distinguish between dropouts, stopouts, and transfer-outs. Journal of College Student Retention, 5(1), 53-70.

Rogers, R. R. (1991). Student development as theory. Proceedings of the American College Personnel Association, Atlanta, Georgia, 1-15. Retrieved May 30, 2005, from the EDRS database.

Schlossberg, N.K., Lynch, A.Q., & Chickering, A.W. (1989). Improving higher education environments for adults. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Schuh, J. (2008). Assessment methods for student affairs. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. 

Schuh, J., Jones, S.R., Harper, S.R., & Komives, S.R. (2011). Student services: A handbook for the profession (fifth edition). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. 

Stamatakos, L. C. (1991). Critique of student development in the literature. Proceedings of the American College Personnel Association, Atlanta, Georgia, 1-8. Retrieved May 30, 2005, from the EDRS database.

Strange, C. (1999). Student development: the evolution and status of an essential idea. Journal of College Student Development 40(5), pp. 570-586.

Strange, C. C. (2004). Constructions of student development across the generations.New Directions for Student Services, (106), 47-57.

Swail, W.S. (2004, June). The art of student retention: A handbook for practitioners and administrators. Paper presented at the 20th Annual Recruitment and Retention Conference, Austin, TX.

Tanaka, G. (2002). Higher education's self-reflexive turn: Toward an intercultural theory of student development. The Journal of Higher Education, 73(2), 263-296.

Tinto, V. (1993). Leaving college. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Tinto, V. (2007). Research and practice of student retention: What next? Journal of College Student Retention, 8(1), 1-19.

Trotter, E. & Roberts, C.A. (2006). Enhancing the early student experience. Higher Education Research & Development, 25(4), 371-386.
Whitehead, L. E. (2006). Preparing for post-secondary education: New roles for governments and families. Canadian Journal of Higher Education, 36(1), 103-111.

Wilcox, P., Winn, S. & Fyvie-Gauld, M. (2005). It has nothing to do with the university, it was just the people: the role of social support in first-year experience of higher education. Studies in Higher Education, 30(6), 707-722.

Wolf-Wendel, L., Ward, K. & Kinzie, J. (2009). A tangled web of terms: The overlap and unique contribution of involvement, engagement, and integration to understanding college student success. Journal of College Student Development, 50(4), pp. 407-428.

Zepke, N., & Leach, L. (2005). Integration and adaptation: Approaches to the student retention and achievement puzzle. Active Learning in Higher Education, 6(1), 46-59.

Student Conduct

Goldblum. A (2009). Restorative Justice from Theory to Practice. In Schrage, J & Giacomni, N. (eds). Reframing Campus Conflict. Sterling, Virgina: Stylus Publishing. p.140-153.

Karp, D & Conrad, S. (2005). Restorative Justice and College Student Misconduct. Public Organization Review: A Global Journal.

Karp, D. & Sacks, C. (2012) Student Conduct, Restorative Justice and Student Development: Findings from the STARR Project (Student Development and Restorative Research Project). Under Review at the Journal of Higher Education.

Karp, D. (2009). Not with a bang but a whimper: A missed opportunity for restorative justice in a plagiarism case. Journal of Student Conduct Administration, 2(1), 26-30.

Karp, D. (2004). Introducing Restorative Justice to the Campus Community. In Restorative justice on the college Campus: Promoting student growth and responsibility, and reawakening the spirit of campus community (D.R. Karp & T. Allena, Eds.). Springfield, IL: Charles C Thomas.

Karp, D.R. (2009). Reading the scripts: Balancing authority and social support in the restorative justice conference and the student conduct hearing board. In Reframing campus conflict: Student conduct practice through a social justice lens (J.M. Schrage & NG. Giacomini, Eds.).

Zehr, H. (2002) The Little Book of Restorative Justice

Law and Policy Report (exploring coordination between campuses and courts): http://www.theasca.org/Files/Publications
/LPR487May12014.pdf

Association for Student Conduct Administration: http://www.theasca.org/

Graduate Students

Brandes, L. (2006). Graduate student centers: Building community and involving students. New Directions for Student Services, 115, 85‐99.

Carr, S. (2000). As distance education comes of age, the challenge is keeping the students. The Chronicle of Higher Education, 46(23), A39‐A41.

Galbraith, M. W. (2003). The adult education professor as mentor: A means to enhance teaching and learning. Perspectives: The New York .Journal of Adult Learning, 1(1), 9‐20.

Garrison, D. R., Anderson, T., & Archer, W. (2001). Critical thinking, cognitive presence, and computer conferencing in distance education. American Journal of Distance Education, 15(1), 1‐24.

Gururaj, Suchitra; Heilig, Julian Vasquez; and Somers, Patricia (2010). Graduate Student Persistence: Evidence from Three Decades. Journal of Student Financial Aid, 40(1), Article 3. Available at: http://publications.nasfaa.org/jsfa/vol40/iss1/3

Holsinger, J. W. (2008), Situational leadership applied to the dissertation process. Anatomical Sciences Education, 1(5), 194–198.

Ivankova, N.V., & Stick, S.L. (2005). Preliminary model of doctoral students’ persistence in the computer-mediated asynchronous learning environment. Journal of Research in Education, 15, 123-144 (available online at http://www.eeraonline.org/journal/files/v15
/JRE_v15n1_Article_9_Ivankova_and_Stick.pdf)

Kiwalik, T.F. (1989). What we know about doctoral student persistence. Innovative Higher Education, 13(2), 163-171.

Norris, C. J., & Barnett, B. (1994). Cultivating a new leadership paradigm: From cohorts to communities. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the University Council of Educational Administration, Philadelphia, PA, October 1994.(ERIC Document Reproduction Service No.ED387877)

Rockinson‐Szapkiw, A., J., & Spaulding, L. S. (2011, under review). Factors that contribute to the successful completion of educational doctorates: How the universities can increase completion rates. The Review of Higher Education.

Rovai, A. P. (2002). Sense of community, perceived cognitive learning and persistence in asynchronous learning networks. Internet and Higher Education, 5(4), 319‐332. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. EJ663074) (doi:10.1016/S1096‐7516(02)00130‐6)

Seagram B., Gould J.& Pyke S. (1998) An investigation of gender and other variables on time to completion of doctoral degrees. Research in Higher Education 39 (3), 319–335.

Smallwood, S. (2004). Doctor dropout. The Chronicle of Higher Education, 50(2) 120‐129.

Terrell, S. R., Snyder, M. M., & Dringus, L. P. (2009). The development, validation, and application of the Doctoral Student Connectedness Scale. Higher Education and the Internet, 12(2), 112‐116. Retrieved from http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1096751609000244

Terrell, S.R., Snyder, M.M., & Dringus, L.P. (2012). A grounded theory of connectivity and persistence in a limited residency doctoral program. The Qualitative Report, 17(62), 1-14.

Wighting, M., Nisbet, D., & Spaulding, L. S. (2009). Relationships between sense of community and academic achievement: A comparison among high school students. The International Journal of the Humanities, 7(3), 63‐72.


Neil Buddel is the Dean of Students, Student Life Enhancement Division at Centennial College. He can be contacted at NBuddel@centennialcollege.ca.